Tiptree Heath

Tiptree Heath

Roy Cornhill

NewsPosted by Joan Pinch 09 Sep, 2014 11:14:10
We are very sad to report the recent death of Roy Cornhill, a Tiptree Naturalist who, as a member of Colchester Natural History Society, amassed a large amount of knowledge and skill in wildlife and habitat management.

During the last few years he has helped us with identifying some of our rarer species on the heath, such as the Heath Bee (bombus jonellus) which has only been found in two sites in Essex. He also recently walked with John More and me to give advice on management methods to progress our heath restoration.

Roy gained his knowledge over the years by frequent trips around the country in the company of Professor Ted Benton of Essex University, where they both made sightings and picked up information from others, and we were very grateful for his help and friendship in our small neck of the woods. Last year he joined our Tiptree Living Landscape team and planned surveys of the wildlife sites across Tiptree, leading small groups to all of them.

Roy will be sadly missed, his funeral is on September 12th and although he was a quiet unassuming man who tried to avoid the limelight, I'm sure it will be well attended by many naturalists from the Colchester area.
Joan
9/9/2014





  • Comments(0)//tiptreeheathblog.tiptreeheath.co.uk/#post7

Woodpecker fledge in time for the fair

NewsPosted by Joan Pinch 23 Jun, 2014 09:07:39

More magic moments, and they come at unexpected times. While Scott, the parish council officer, was mowing the "fairground" for us, there was a lot of commotion coming from just inside the wood by the stream. Most of the noise was from adult green woodpeckers, but also an undertone of grunts and strange noises. Two ladies had flagged up that there were baby birds in the area and we'd been keeping a covert watch (just like Springwatch!).

Later in the morning, Ron, Sue, Di and Jane came after an emergency callout to help rake away the mown grass nearest to the pony fence (ponies may choke if they swallow fresh mowings which don't need to be chewed first). Now that the tractor had gone, we could hear the woodpecker noises clearly, and homed in on the large willow stump alongside the stream. After a few muttered sounds, a grey head appeared with a pale pink cap, looked around and quickly disappeared again. We could hear the parents calling from across the stream, apparently encouraging the chick to come out.

The final result was that Sue saw the chick fly from the hole and it seemed to go down into the nettles. We decided to leave it to start its new life. I still hear the woodpeckers around the woods there, and hopefully the chick is doing well.

If you are reading this and have any more related information to share, do get in touch with the website.

Joan





  • Comments(0)//tiptreeheathblog.tiptreeheath.co.uk/#post5

Heath May happenings

NewsPosted by Joan Pinch 04 Jun, 2014 17:49:35

What a brilliant start to May, at 4am, with the Dawn Chorus Walk on the heath! 30 species of bird were seen or heard, the highlights being 4 nightingales, a lesser whitethroat and greylag geese flying over on their way to Tiptree Quarry. The following week at the Evening Walk, again 30 species were identified, this time the spectacle of a hobby flying over the treetops was the most exciting experience of a wonderful evening.

The results of those walks were the best in recent memory on Tiptree Heath, and lists can be seen below.

Magic moments occur frequently, and the visit of 90 Year 5 and 6 pupils from St Luke’s during the same week contained many of them. They learned about the animals, plants and history of the heath, and got really interested, some in the glass bottles and pots rising to the surface in the Quarry, which had been put there in the early 1900s; some in the holes in the banks, during which activity a boy watched a bluetit flying into its nest in the trunk of an oak tree; some were fascinated by the trees and heathers. I think the teachers and parents enjoyed themselves very much also.

Dawn Chorus

Evening Walk

Blackbird

Blackbird

Blackcap

Blackcap

Blue tit

Blue tit

Chaffinch

Chaffinch

Chiffchaff

Chiffchaff

Cormorant

Crow

Crow

Cuckoo

Cuckoo

Dunnock

Dunnock

Great tit

Great spotted woodpecker

Green woodpecker

Green woodpecker

Greylag goose

Hobby

Herring gull

Jackdaw

Jackdaw

Jay

Jay

Lesser black backed gull

Lesser whitethroat

Linnet

Linnet

Little egret

Long tailed tit

Mallard

Mallard

Mistle thrush

Mistle thrush

Nightingale

Nightingale

Pheasant

Pheasant

Pied wagtail

Red legged partridge

Robin

Robin

Skylark

Songthrush

Songthrush

Stock dove

Swift

Tawny Owl

Whitethroat

Whitethroat

Willow warbler

Willow warbler

Wood pigeon

Wood pigeon

Wren

Wren



  • Comments(0)//tiptreeheathblog.tiptreeheath.co.uk/#post3
« Previous